Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program

The Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program provides students with scholarships that have an IEP (Individualized Education Plan) from their district of residence that are eligible to attend school from kindergarten through 12th grade.  Here is a link to the ODE site for more information on the scholarship and here is link to do a search on the list of providers.  The scholarship is an educational choice program meaning that if a student is approved for the scholarship, the public district is no longer responsible for providing a free and appropriate education (FAPE).  The student must use the scholarship to obtain their education AND supportive services.  In order to use the Jon Peterson Special needs Scholarship, the parent must withdraw the child from the public school district and the parent gives up the right to a free and appropriate public education (FAPE).  Make sure to check ODE’s Parent Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

Click here for a pdf of the Jon Peterson Scholarship Category Amounts

 

Here are excerpts from Ohio’s Code of Law pertaining to the Jon Peterson Scholarship:

3301-101 Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program

3301-101-10 Payment of scholarship amounts.

(B) The maximum amount [note: not guaranteed amount] awarded to an eligible student shall be as follows:

  • (1) For a category one student, seven thousand one hundred ninety-six dollars [$7,196];
  • (2) For a category two student, seven thousand six hundred eight dollars [$7,608];
  • (3) For a category three student, fourteen thousand eight hundred thirty-two dollars [$14,832];
  • (4) For a category four student, seventeen thousand nine hundred two dollars [$17,902];
  • (5) For a category five student, twenty thousand dollars [$20,000]; and
  • (6) For a category six student, twenty thousand dollars [$20,000].
3301-101-01 Definitions
  • (D) “Category one” child is a child who has been identified with a disability of speech or language impairment as defined in rule 3301-51-01 of the Administrative Code;
  • (E) “Category two” child is a child who has been identified as specific learning disabled as that term is defined in rule 3301-51-01 of the Administrative Code, cognitively disabled as that term is defined in rule 3301-51-01 of the Administrative Code, or other health impairment-minor as defined in section 3317.02 of the Revised Code;
  • (F) “Category three” child is a child who has been identified as vision impaired, hearing impaired or as severe behavior disabled as those terms are defined in rule 3301-51-01 of the Administrative Code;
  • (G) “Category four” child is a child who has been identified with an orthopedic impairment as that term is defined in rule 3301-51-01 of the Administrative Code or as having an other health impairment-major, as defined in section 3317.02 of the Revised Code;
  • (H) “Category five” child is a child who has been identified with multiple disabilities as that term is defined in rule 3301-51-01 of the Administrative Code;
  • (I) “Category six” child is a child who has been identified as autistic as that term is defined in rule 3301-51-01 of the Administrative Code, as having traumatic brain injuries as that term is defined in rule 3301-51-01 of the Administrative Code, or as deaf-blind as that term is defined in rule 3301-51-01 of the Administrative Code
3301-51-01   Applicability of requirements and definitions.
  • (ix) “Other health impairment” means having limited strength, vitality, or alertness, including a heightened alertness to environmental stimuli, that results in limited alertness with respect to the educational environment, that:
    • (a) Is due to chronic or acute health problems such as asthma, attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, diabetes, epilepsy, a heart condition, hemophilia, lead poisoning, leukemia, nephritis, rheumatic fever, sickle cell anemia, and tourette syndrome; and
    • (b) Adversely affects a child’s educational performance.
  • (x) Specific learning disability.
    • (a) General. “Specific learning disability” means a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, that may manifest itself in the imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or to do mathematical calculations, including conditions such as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia.
    • (b) Disorders not included. Specific learning disability does not include learning problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor disabilities, of mental retardation, of emotional disturbance, or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage.
  • (xi) “Speech or language impairment” means a communication disorder, such as stuttering, impaired articulation, a language impairment, or a voice impairment, that adversely affects a child’s educational performance.

Other Health Impairment (OHI)

In Ohio, there are two classifications of Other Health Impairment – Major and Minor.  OHI Minor is a category 2 child which has a maximum amount of $7,608.  I think a child with a diagnosis of ADHD falls under the category of OHI – Minor.  OHI Major is a category 4 child  which has a maximum amount of $17,902.

Here is a letter issued by the Ohio Department of Education issued February 20,2010 regarding the distinction between other health impairment – major and other health impairment – minor.  Basically, a child that is considered medically fragile is considered to have an other health impairment – major.  These conditions include:

  • tracheotomy
  • central IV line
  • ventilator
  • tube feedings
  • percussion and drainage
  • suctioning
  • oxygen dependent
  • instability of child’s medical condition requiring at least weekly services of a doctor of medicine or osteopathy
  • requiring daily services of a registered nurse
  • at risk of institutionalization in a hopsital, skilled nursing facility, or intermediate care facility